Avoid the Slide! Six Tips for a Successful Summer Climb

By Becky Higdon & Nichole Jones

Splashing in the pool, building sandcastles, summer camp, star gazing… summer is an exciting (and often exhausting) time for kids and parents alike. But, the long break from school often leads to the summer brain drain popularly known as “summer slide.” If you do a quick google search on the topic you’ll find statistics like these about summer learning loss:
 

  • Students can lose up to 15% of their academic ability over the summer if they don’t read, write, or practice math.
  • Loss is greatest in math and science.
  • Two-thirds of the achievement gap between ninth graders can be explained by summer learning loss during elementary school years.
     

Learning loss is inevitable when kids take the summer off from educational activities. But don’t worry, even if you haven’t enforced a summer reading program or practiced daily math facts there’s still plenty of summer left. Start summer brain gain before the gap widens using some of these tips for your child’s “summer climb.”

1. Go on field trips. Whether it’s part of your planned vacation or it’s a trip to a farm, encourage your child to be inquisitive and observant. Remind them that learning is fun. Consider including a scavenger hunt as part of a morning hike or making a journal together for your child to document his adventure. If there’s time, build experiences by letting your child help plan your trip – research what to do and expect (history of a battle, physics of a roller coaster, or habitat for animals you might see along the way), map your route, build a budget, and find out how much gas you will need. Your child will learn valuable planning skills as well.

2. Play school. Let your child be the teacher and have your child teach you something, read you a book, or read a math problem together and let them walk you through how he or she solves a math problem. For older kids, give them an opportunity to tutor a younger student, whether a sibling or a neighbor, tutoring can be a fun way to reinforce language or math skills. They say a true test of comprehension is whether or not you can teach someone else. Whether formal or informal, a tutoring session can be fun and will help both the tutor and pupil to review vital skills and keep them fresh during the summer months.

3. Make nice with screen-time. Harness the power of educational technology by looking for devices and content designed to address specific learning objectives that are age appropriate and fun. There are a variety of educational videos on YouTube or Netflix that can entertain your child but help them learn at the same time. Make screen time count by choosing programs and educational games that will keep your child engaged, ready to take in new information, and reinforce reading and math skills.

4. Read, read, and read more. Put aside time for reading every day. Encourage your child to read to you throughout the day and during everyday activities. Whether its road signs, instructions for a science experiment, a recipe or the grocery list, provide your child opportunities to be part of your day through reading. Don’t forget to be part of your child’s reading routine too though, bring back the bedtime story or create a time for you to read above your child’s reading ability to help build vocabulary and explore new subjects.

5. Experiment. Let your child explore in the kitchen with a new recipe or in the backyard with a new science project. Have them find a recipe that they would like to make, let them make the grocery list, build a budget for how much to spend, shop and then make the recipe. Baking can help little ones continue to build fine motor skills and is good for practicing using measuring tools. Encourage older children to double a recipe and build math skills by calculating the new measurements for ingredients. Don’t have a sous chef on your hands? Try a science experiment instead. Whether it’s a simple float or sink exercise, color mixing or making energy with a lemon and a flashlight. Build on your child’s interests to investigate and explore.

6. Play games. Inside or outside, brain games or physical activity, there are ways to incorporate summer learning challenges into summer fun. Create opportunity to integrate math into easy physical challenges by measuring the distance of a long jump or high jump, timing races, or skip counting reps. Whether playing a competitive sports game on the lawn or a board game (bonus points for games that require critical thinking!) in the family room, let your child keep score. Even playing with blocks or putting a puzzle together can benefit a child during the summer months by helping them learn spatial skills and recognize patterns.

The research is clear—summer learning loss is a significant problem for children of all ages and from all socioeconomic backgrounds. Don’t let the slide bring your family down, these tips combined with a little extra effort to get into a back to school routine before school starts, will surely help with your child’s summer climb. Enjoy the rest of your summer! 

Originally published at https://frederick.macaronikid.com/articles/598067738b55662a77cb3279/avoid-the-slide-six-tips-for-a-successful-summer-climb

FNP: Honor Roll Listing (Q1-2, 2016-2017)

As published in the Frederick News Post, click here for online article. 

The following students have been named to the honor roll for the second marking period of the 2016-2017 school year at Frederick Christian Academy:

Principal’s list — Grade one: Funmi Amusa, Parker Coblentz, Abel Pau, Max Romero and Madelyn Wrenn; grade two: Jude Annor and Jacob Honnold; grade three: Christiaan Durham and Jonathan Young; grade four: Janel Morrisey; grade five: Adam Cubbage; grade six: Nathaniel Pigatt; grade seven: Allison Rhea; grade eight: Justin Morrisey and David Ramler; grade nine: Spenser Hoover and Jon Pigatt; grade 11:Henry Koffman, Joanna Pigatt and Laceyann Riggs; grade 12: Caleb Corselius and Sonal Matharu.

Distinguished Honors list — grade one: Eris Foshee and Kelsey Ryan; grade two: Josh Foshee, Christopher Jones and Jax Johnson-Lincoln; grade three: Xenia Quire; grade five: Anna Parker, Johana Thomas and Abby Young; grade six: Sadie Ryan; grade eight: Annalise Hart, Nathan Parker and Douglas McClure; grade nine: Jaedin Urgent-Chapple; grade 10: JJ Morrisey; grade 11: Hannah Cardosi; grade 12:Aksha Matharu and Samantha Rhea.

Honor roll — grade two: Isaiah Ohio; grade five: Jonathan Annor and Philip Salsi; grade six: Reagan Krupicka; grade nine: Thomas Riggs; grade 12: Rose Ramler.

FNP: Honor Roll Listing (Q3 2015-2016)

The following students have been named to the honor roll for the third marking period of the 2015-2016 school year at Frederick Christian Academy:

Principal’s List: Grade one: Jude Annor, Joshua Foshee, Olivia Guilford, Jacob Honnold, Jaxson Johnson-Lincoln, Christopher Jones, Isaiah Ohio; Grade two: Matthew Cubbage, Christiaan Durham, Xenia Quire, Jonathan Young; Grade three: Janel Morrisey; Grade four: Adam Cubbage, Philip Salsi, Johana Thomas, Abigail Young; Grade five: Nathaniel Pigatt, Sadie Ryan; Grade six: Allison Rhea; Grade seven: Justin Morrisey, David Ramler; Grade eight: Jacob Grimm, Spenser Hoover, Jon Pigatt; Grade nine: J.J. Morrisey; Grade 10: Henry Koffman, Joanna Pigatt, Laceyann Riggs; Grade 11: Caleb Corselius; Grade 12: Amelia Budd, Joseph Koffman.

Distinguished Honors List: Grade four: Jonathan Annor Phillip Kirillov, Anna Parker, Michael Santamaria; Grade six: Gregory Quire; Grade seven: Brandon Evans, Nathan Parker; Grade 10: Hannah Cardosi; Grade 11: Aksha Matharu, Sonal Matharu, Rose Ramler, Samantha Rhea.

Honor Roll: Grade five: Reagan Krupicka; Grade seven: Annalise Hart, Reuben Kirillov; Grade eight: Thomas Riggs.

 

FCA Featured in Frederick's Child Magazine April/May 2016

Kindergarten Readiness: 5 Ways You Can Prepare Your Child Now
By Joyce Scott

Sending your child off to school for the first time is hard. For many of us, it triggers a series of emotions all across the scale (sometimes simultaneously!) from happiness to sadness. But most of all, it triggers our inherent anxiety that we haven’t prepared our child enough for kindergarten. As a seasoned mom and teacher, I want you to know you’re not alone. But more importantly, whether you have an infant or a preschooler, there are simple ways you can help prepare your child for kindergarten today. Beyond the basic and practical skills such as dressing independently, knowing the ABCs, and holding a pencil—here are five ideas you can start now to give your child a happy first year of school (chances are you’re already doing some of them today, so relax, you’re a great parent!).

  1. Lead by example. You are your child’s first and most important teacher.  It is your job to model the behavior that you would like to see developed in them: kindness, empathy, gratitude, confidence.  Furthermore, teach them forgiveness. When you’ve been offended, forgive.  When you are the offender, be humble enough to admit it and ask for forgiveness! This will go a long way in the classroom. It warms my heart when I see a child set aside the grudge-holding or pouting when they are wronged and is willing to offer a friend an apology instead.

  2. Be a listener. Slow down, look at, and really listen to your child.  I know I don’t have to tell you this one because chances are you already know how important it is. But really, try to connect with your child as often as possible through engaging conversation. Not only does listening to your child with undivided attention give your child confidence that will relay to the classroom, it also is time well spent. Likewise, encourage them to listen and talk to others. Help your child develop an attitude of respect toward adults and teach them how to have a conversation. Promoting good conversational skills will help them not just in kindergarten, but for a lifetime.

  3. Provide meaningful experiences.  Rich, diverse experiences broaden a child’s outlook, enrich their vocabulary and communication skills, and spark curiosity and a love for learning. The time spent on engaging activities and family outings represents an opportunity to help children grow and acquire important social and emotional skills to develop lifelong interests. A visit to a zoo, museum, or library isn’t just fun for you and your child; it is an opportunity to learn! 

  4. Instill a love for reading. I cannot write enough here! Early reading habits are central to the readiness of a child entering kindergarten. Over the years as a teacher, I have noticed the significant differences in my students who are immersed in a print-rich world as a preschooler versus those who were not.  But don’t worry! It’s not too late to help your kids to enjoy reading. There are so many ways to encourage lifelong readers. Here are a few suggestions:

    • Enjoy reading. Yes, you! Kids should see us enjoy reading (and if you don’t, then pretend you do!). 

    • Read aloud to your child every day. 

    • After you read a story, ask your child to re-tell it. What did they like or dislike about it? If they were the writer, what would they change?  You don’t need to do all of these after every story, but give them an opportunity to express their thoughts and ideas. 

    • Let them write their own story! Ask your child tell you a story. Write it down and then read it back to them.  My kindergarteners LOVE this! 

    • Play word games, sorting games, and rhyming games with your child. 

    • Provide plenty of books of all types and teach them the proper way to take care of them. Whether you’re purchasing or borrowing books, in our digital media world it’s still important to let your preschooler touch and feel “real” books.

  5. Set expectations.  Give your child an idea of what a typical day in kindergarten will be. For example, you can tell them, “There will be a time for playing, singing, being quiet, and also a time for ‘work,’ like learning letters and sounds, and counting and writing numbers.  There is a bathroom break (when needed) and a time for lunch, snack, etc.” Remind them that even though you’re not there, that their teacher loves them, is there to help them, encourage them, and teach them to do right. Moreover, light-hearted role playing (i.e. how to be a good friend and what to do or say if their classmate is not being a good friend) is a good idea and can help them overcome nervousness and build confidence before their first day of school.  

I think my child is ready, but am I? When that first day of school does come (and wow, does it sneak up on us!), carefully guard against being over-indulgent or over-protective. I still remember the days I followed my firstborn (now 29!) into the classroom….doing all of his morning duties for him and then squatting down next to his little chair. I was worried whether he was ready to start his day; little did I realize that his slight separation anxiety was being ratcheted up by his worry-wart mother! This went on for about a week when finally his sweet teacher met me at the door one morning.  She gave him a teddy bear to hold if he “started missing mommy,” she then smiled, assured me he would have a great day and then promptly said good-bye while closing the door! He grew leaps and bounds that day. 

Since then, every fall you’ll hear me remind my own parents of kindergarteners, “Quick goodbyes, keep dry eyes!”  It is true.  Send them off with confidence and enthusiasm, and at the end of the day be prepared to hear all about their wondrous adventures!


This article was originally published in Frederick's Child Magazine, April/May 2016 Edition.